The Truth

Being aware of yourself and mindful of your actions is key in coming across the way that you intend to. However, most people don’t spend much time premeditating the way they want to be perceived by their peers. Everyone is, in a way, reacting to their own interactions and surroundings. The way that you react to situations is almost entirely what defines you to other people.

Unfortunately, most of the time we walk around unaware of how others perceive us until we are told. The only time that our rhythm of blissful ignorance is interrupted is in cases of praise, or slightly unpleasant conversations. I don’t think that it is necessary to premeditate all of our actions, in fact it is impossible. However, I do believe that one way to approach mindfulness is to have humility and patience when responding to situations.

Humility

Humility happens to be one of the most powerful, yet underrated character traits that a person can have. While humility sometimes seems to be undermining a person of their accomplishments, it is in a way empowering them. What I mean by this is that being humble frees you from the need to impress. You are not striving to gain praise, you are striving to become better.

  • Recognizing that your knowledge is limited — Being humble means acknowledging that you don’t know everything. Including the outside factors that affect people and systems.
  • Trying to help — The spirit of lending a hand is a result of being humble. Humility want to help others. You recognize that there is a bigger picture than yourself and you want to be a part of improving that picture.
  • Learning from your failures/successes — every situation is different and we may handle certain situations better than others. However, it is important to grow from both the good and the bad.

In the end, everyone comes from a different background that has shaped them into the person that they are, and the person that we perceive. It often takes times of reflection and growth to combine the way that you intend to be and the way that you are perceived.